Gros Morne

Gros Morne

There's no place in the world like Gros Morne National Park. Dare to spy your first moose for bragging rights as a 'real Canadian'. Or head up to the Tablelands and walk on the oldest rock in the world. Or kayak the Trout River Ponds to check out the amazing views. Or ... do it all!

Activities

Moose Viewing

Did you know that moose are members of the deer family? But don't worry about mistaking a deer for a moose because moose are massive! These grand beasts are about the size of a sub-compact car.

The boys are called bulls and the girls cows. It's usually pretty easy to tell the difference because the bulls have antlers. But did you know that they shed their antlers each year and grow new ones?

And in case you're wondering how the moose got to Newfoundland, they didn't swim here – they were first brought over in 1904. Now there are over 150,000 moose in the province! That's one moose for every 3.5 people in Newfoundland and Labrador.

When you're looking for moose, they're probably eating because they consume about 25 kilograms of plants each day. All that munching makes them thirsty so look for them around rivers, streams and lakes. And don't be surprised if you see a moose floating by. They're very good swimmers.

How much time will I need?

  • About 1 hour

Do I need any special equipment or gear? What else should I bring?

  • Camera, binoculars, water, proper footwear and clothing.

Is this activity free?

  • Yes

When's the best time to do this?

  • Daytime during the summer (June-Sept)

Walk on the Oldest Rock in the World (Tablelands)

Where did all that rock come from? It's flat, and red and nothing grows on it. It's not like any other rocks you'll find in your own backyard.

Tablelands is one the few examples in the world of the earth's mantle rising to the surface. The earth is a ball with a solid centre surrounded by a liquid core enveloped by a mantle of rock wrapped in a crust of water and land. Millions of years ago when the earth was forming, layers of rock far below the surface collided and pushed up. During the ice ages, the weight of the ice held the rocks down but as the ice melted, they got on the move again and pushed and pushed until some of the mantle broke through the crust.

Walk on this desert of rock that contains vast amounts of iron that makes the rocks rust and look red. The minerals in the rock also make it hard for plants to grow there.

The earth under our feet is constantly on the move, just like millions of years ago. Every year farmers find new rocks coming up like flowers in the spring. Check your own garden to see if Mother Nature has moved the earth for you! You just won't find mantle rock!

How much time will I need?

  • 2 – 3 hours, but can vary with your experience

Do I need any special equipment or gear? What else should I bring?

  • Water, camera and proper footwear. Be prepared to wear clothing for cold and windy weather.

Is this activity free?

  • Yes. There are even free guided tours offered during the summer.

When's the best time to do this?

  • Available year-round, but daytime hikes during the summer months (June-Sept) can take advantage of the guided tours.

Kayak the Trout River

Kayaking is a terrific eco-friendly way to view the Tablelands and the sheer cliffs of the Trout River Ponds. Paddle in silent wonder at the ability of glacial ice to carve a natural treasure.

The two land-locked ponds are 15 km in length and are separated by a narrow gap. They were formed by receding glaciers, another example of the effect of time and the elements on the landscape. Pull into one of the beaches for a swim on a sunny day, or picnic in view of the cliffs and forest of Gregory Plateau.

Be sure to consult the weather forecast when planning your kayaking adventure. The long, narrow Trout River Ponds can be whipped up by strong winds whistling down the fjord. Kayaking is fun on a calm day, but don't forget the bug spray! There's nothing for the bugs to eat on the Tablelands except people!

How much time will I need?

  • 2 – 3 hours, or longer if you take your time

Do I need any special equipment or gear? What else should I bring?

  • Kayak, camera, water, proper clothing (it can get cold and windy on the water!), personal floatation device, navigation equipment, rope, bailer, whistle. Rental kayaks are available.

Is this activity free?

  • Yes, but there is a cost if you wish to rent a kayak from one of the 3rd party retailers in the park.

When's the best time to do this?

  • Daytime during the summer (June-Sept)

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